Extension News from the West

Science of gardening taught through new program

Master Gardeners tour the Washoe County Master Gardener Demo Garden, the produce of which is donated to local nonprofit organizations. Photo by Wendy Hanson Mazet, Cooperative Extension.

Cooperative Extension offers new Home Horticulture Certificate

Individuals wanting a deeper understanding of the science behind backyard gardening in northern Nevada are invited to attend University of Nevada Cooperative Extension’s new Home Horticulture Certificate Program, provided by Extension’s Master Gardeners in Washoe County. Participants will learn from Extension faculty and staff, and from experienced horticulturalists. The new series is also the introductory course for those who want to become Master Gardener volunteers for Washoe County.

Learning the science

“This series is great for those who are new to northern Nevada, interested in learning more about the science of gardening and want to apply science-based knowledge to their own projects,” said Northern Nevada Master Gardener Coordinator Leilani Konyshev.

The classes are 12:30-3:30 p.m., Tuesdays and Thursdays, Aug. 27-Sept. 19, with the certification exam 12:30-3:30 p.m., Sept. 24. The cost is $135 and includes course materials and supplies, refreshments and technology fees. Register online at the registraion page, or by contacting Konyshev at 775-336-0274 or konyshevL@unce.unr.edu.

Teaching the science

For those wanting to not just learn the science but also provide research-based horticulture information and programs to the community, Cooperative Extension also offers the Master Gardener Training Program, 12:30-3:30 p.m., Tuesdays and Thursdays, Oct. 8-Nov. 14. Individuals wanting to enroll in the program must submit their applications to Konyshev by Aug. 20, complete the Home Horticulture Certification Program and pass the exam, and complete an interview. To apply, print and mail the application available at the Master Gardener Program website.

The cost for the additional training, due after being accepted into the program, is $265 and includes books, handouts, refreshments, events, course materials and supplies, technology fees, program supplies, fingerprinting, awards, certificates, a name badge, a tote bag, a t-shirt, and a reusable water bottle. Applicants will become full Master Gardener volunteers after completing the additional training, passing an exam and providing an initial 40 hours of community service and 30 hours each year to maintain an active volunteer status. Cooperative Extension offers ongoing educational and community service opportunities to help Master Gardeners maintain certification.

All classes take place at the Cooperative Extension office at 4955 Energy Way in Reno. For more information, contact Konyshev at 775-336-0274 or konyshevL@unce.unr.edu. Persons in need of special assistance should call at least three days prior to the event.

Water-efficient landscape training and certification offered

Participants will learn how to conduct a water audit on an existing landscape during the QWEL training. Photo by Jenn Fisher, Cooperative Extension.

Cooperative Extension class prepares landscapers for Qualified Water Efficient Landscaper certification

University of Nevada Cooperative Extension invites local green-industry professionals, including landscapers, groundskeepers and nursery workers, to attend the Qualified Water Efficient Landscaper (QWEL) training in Reno, Aug. 20-22. The training will prepare participants to take the certification exam on Aug. 23 to become certified professionals.

“This training provides the opportunity for green-industry professionals to step up their education, making them more competitive in the industry and training them to help Nevadans become more water efficient,” Cooperative Extension Northern Area Horticulture Specialist Heidi Kratsch said.

The training is part of Extension’s Qualified Water Efficient Landscaper Certification (QWEL) Program. Professionals certified by the program, which was designed by the Sonoma-Marin Saving Water Partnership and is recognized by the Environmental Protection Agency, will be listed on the EPA’s WaterSense website, and on the QWEL website, where local landowners can find them for hire. In addition, certified QWEL professionals can use the QWEL logo on their vehicles and business cards as a means of marketing their qualifications to their customers.

Classes are taught by Cooperative Extension and Truckee Meadows Water Authority faculty, staff and industry professionals. Participants will be provided with local water, soil and plant information; basic and advanced irrigation principles; and hands-on water audit skills they can use in the field.

Anyone can take the training for personal knowledge, and professionals are encouraged to take the exam to become certified. Workshops will be held:

  • Aug. 20, 9 a.m.-3 p.m., lunch will be provided
  • Aug. 21, 9 a.m.-5 p.m., lunch will be provided
  • Aug. 22, 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m., lunch will be provided
  • Aug. 23, 9 a.m.-noon: certification exam

Cost for the training is $100 and includes the hands-on water audit, reference manual, class supplies, lunch and refreshments. The certification exam is 9 a.m.-noon, Aug. 23, and the cost is $50. Both the training and the certification exam are at the Cooperative Extension office at 4955 Energy Way in Reno.

Registration is a two-step process, beginning at the QWEL-Reno webpage. For more information on classes or certification, contact Cooperative Extension Commercial Landscape Horticulture Program Coordinator Jenn Fisher at fisherj@unce.unr.edu or 775-336-0249. Persons in need of special accommodations or assistance should call at least three days prior to the beginning of the workshops.

University offers agricultural crop research tours at Field Day

Chickpeas are one of the crops being researched by University of Nevada Cooperative Extension at the Nevada Agricultural Experiment Station Newlands Research Center. Photo by Maninder K. Walia.

Research being done on drought-tolerant and salt-tolerant crops

Agriculture producers and others are invited to get a first-hand look at crop trials and research being conducted in northern Nevada by the University of Nevada, Reno’s College of Agriculture, Biotechnology & Natural Resources. Field Day in Fallon is free and open to the public, and will take place 9-11 a.m., Aug. 13, at the College’s Nevada Agricultural Experiment Station Newlands Research Center at 2053 Schurz Highway.

“The limited amount of water available for crop production is posing challenges for long-term sustainability,” said Maninder K. Walia, field crop specialist with University of Nevada Cooperative Extension, also part of the College. “So we are testing new crops to reduce Nevada’s water use.”

The Field Day will include walking tours and discussions of crops being researched, including:

  • alfalfa variety trials;
  • new crops of chickpeas, dry beans and forage soybeans;
  • new commercial grain and forage sorghum hybrids; and
  • over 400 varieties of sorghum and pearl millet.

Opportunities to partner with the University to develop new crop varieties and cropping systems adapted to northern Nevada will also be presented. Plant traits discussed will include early maturity, forage nutrient content, potential for biomass production, salt tolerance, drought tolerance and specialty grain traits for use in brewing. Refreshments will be provided. Close-toed shoes, long pants, hats and sunscreen are recommended.

For more information or to register, call 775-423-5121 or email brownl@unce.unr.edu by Aug. 9. Persons in need of special assistance should call three days prior to the event.

Garden tour celebrates backyard creativity in the high desert

Master Gardener Earstin Whitten’s garden is one of the gardens showcased during the 2019 Northern Nevada Garden Tour. Photo by Earstin Whitten, Cooperative Extension volunteer.

Cooperative Extension presents the 2019 Northern Nevada Garden Tour

University of Nevada Cooperative Extension’s Master Gardeners in Washoe County are offering community members the opportunity to tour gardens in Reno and Sparks as part of the 2019 Northern Nevada Garden Tour. This child-friendly event, hosted in partnership with the Rail City Garden Center, takes place 9 a.m.-3 p.m., Aug. 17-18.

“Tour goers will be astounded at what fellow high-desert gardeners have created,” said Northern Nevada Master Gardener Coordinator Leilani Konyshev. “They will walk away with inspiration and ideas from the area’s most successful Nevada gardeners and do-it-yourselfers.”

The tour is self-paced, and participants are able to visit as many of the featured gardens as they like. Participants will also receive a full-color tour guidebook covering the gardens available for viewing.

The cost is $20 for one person and $30 for two, and children under 12 are free. All proceeds support the Master Gardeners Volunteer Program in Washoe County, which provides research-based horticulture information and programs to the community. Tickets are available at the registration website.

For more information, contact Konyshev at 775-336-0274 or konyshevl@unce.unr.edu. Persons in need of special assistance should call at least three days prior to the event.

Free green industry class to discuss tree irrigation

To promote healthy root growth, one to two emitters are not sufficient. Photo by Jenn Fisher, Cooperative Extension.

Cooperative Extension series teaches sustainable horticulture to local professionals

As part of the Green Industry Continuing Education Series, University of Nevada Cooperative Extension presents “Trees and Irrigation” noon-1 p.m., Aug. 13, at the Cooperative Extension Office at 4955 Energy Way in Reno.

"Trees in our region rely almost entirely on water from irrigation to survive and thrive,” said Cooperative Extension Commercial Horticulture Program Coordinator Jenn Fisher. “Much of the irrigation water provided to trees in our region is not sufficient to maintain healthy and beautiful trees, so proper irrigation strategies need to be employed.”

The class, taught by Extension’s Northern Nevada Horticulture Specialist Heidi Kratsch, will outline the impacts of drought on trees and the multiple strategies needed to protect them. Kratsch will focus on proper irrigation of trees, with and without surrounding turf grass areas, and how to manage irrigation of trees throughout their life cycle for good health. The class offers International Society of Arboriculture and Qualified Water Efficient Landscaper Continuing Education Units (CEUs).

The Green Industry Continuing Education Series provides current, research-based information to green-industry professionals. For upcoming classes, visit the series website.

Register online at the registration page. For more information on classes or certification, contact Fisher at fisherj@unce.unr.edu or 775-336-0249. Persons in need of special accommodations or assistance should call at least three days prior to the class they intend to attend.

Charles Schembre brings vineyard experience to Desert Farming Initiative

Charles Schembre plants a new 1-acre demonstration vineyard to continue studying wine grapes. Photo by Robert Moore.

Experience in soil health and biodiversity will benefit the Experiment Station’s research and programs

The Desert Farming Initiative welcomes a new project manager, Charles Schembre, to the Nevada Agriculture Experiment Station. The Initiative is a diversified commercial farm at the University that serves as a demonstration, education, outreach and research farming program. It is a collaborative project of the University’s College of Agriculture, Biotechnology & Natural Resources and its Experiment Station and Cooperative Extension units.

Schembre joined the University in Fall 2018, and in December, he attended a course so he and DFI staff could teach food safety best practices and began developing a technical assistance program to teach Nevada growers how to comply with the Food Safety Modernization Act. This past spring, Schembre oversaw the planting of a new, 1-acre demonstration vineyard of cabernet franc, merlot and malbec wine grapes at the University, expanding upon more than 20 years of wine grape research done at the Experiment Station focusing on techniques for advancing viticulture in the high desert. Schembre previously worked for the Napa County Resource Conservation District managing a demonstration vineyard and orchard, as well as multiple conservation programs focused on soil health, water conservation and bio diversity. He also served two terms in the AmeriCorps Watershed Stewards Project.

In addition to researching grapes at the new vineyard, Schembre says the Initiative is conducting trials on vegetables and fruits, such as winter lettuce and raspberries, to collect crop data on different growing conditions.

“We collect data on 30 different varieties of vegetables we grow and also provide services, like organic plant propagation, to the local agriculture industry,” he said.

Schembre hopes to expand the farming operation to become a mid-sized farm that focuses on precision farming techniques. He also wants to create more teaching and learning opportunities for students at the Experiment Station, as well as expand the Initiative’s services to the community.

“I hope that with the expansion of the farming operation we can donate even more to the food pantry,” explained Schembre. “I also look forward to continuing to provide the latest research-based food safety information to our state’s producers, which is one of the Initiative’s primary focuses.”

Livestock, classic cars, art and live entertainment at Carson City Fair

FFA and Cooperative Extension 4-H youth present their project sheep at last year’s Carson City Fair. Photo by Larry Burton, Cooperative Extension.

Cooperative Extension partners with community nonprofits to offer free family event July 26-28

University of Nevada Cooperative Extension presents the 2019 Carson City Fair July 26-28, at Fuji Park, 601 Old Clear Creek Road. The event is put on in partnership with the Northern Nevada Antique Power Club, Simerson Events, LLC and others to celebrate youth and agriculture.

“We have something to interest everyone in the family here during the Carson City Fair,” said Lisa K. Taylor, Cooperative Extension educator in Carson City. “From the livestock show and sale to performances by local singers and dancers to nightly demolition derbies, there will be fun activities for all.”

Some highlights include a youth dog show and agility event, and shows and contests where youth from Cooperative Extension’s 4-H Youth Development Program, FFA and National Grange Youth will present animals they have raised, including dogs, pigs, sheep, goats, beef, dairy goats, dairy cattle, rabbits, rodents and poultry. The animal presentations will culminate in a livestock sale, 5 p.m., July 27.

In addition, community members of all ages can participate in static contests in more than 25 categories, spanning clothing and textiles; food and food preservation; fine arts; heritage; photography; quilting; science, engineering and technology; horticulture; conservation and wildlife; and others.

A variety of free, live entertainment will perform throughout the event on the grassy area. There will also be an antique tractor and engine show and parade, antique cars and vintage semi-trucks. Paid entertainment includes an inaugural demolition derby, 7-9 p.m., July 26 and 27.

Other new events include the American Ninja Farmer competition, honey tasting, youth and adult sidewalk chalk competitions and youth gunny sack races, all provided at no charge. A silent auction will take place inside the Exhibit Hall. July 27 is the annual Safety Day for youth and their families, and Community Resource Awareness Day, where local nonprofit agencies will be on hand to share what they do to commemorate their contributions to the community. The Vitalant Blood Mobile will also be on site July 27 at 10 a.m. for those wishing to donate blood.

Limited parking is available on site and overflow parking will be available in the parking lot of the Walmart Supercenter off Topsy Lane, 3770 U.S. Highway 395 S. in Carson City. A JAC (Jump Around Carson) bus will be available to shuttle fairgoers between the fairgrounds and parking lot. The Fair bus route information and a complete list of events and activities can be found on the fair’s website. Or, contact the Cooperative Extension office in Carson City at 775-887-2252.

Free green industry class to discuss plant disorders

Browning turfgrass is a common sight during the summer months and could be the result of an abiotic or biotic disorder. Photo by Wendy Hanson Mazet, Cooperative Extension.

Cooperative Extension series teaches sustainable horticulture to local professionals

As part of the Green Industry Continuing Education Series, University of Nevada Cooperative Extension presents “Abiotic & Biotic Disorders,” noon-1 p.m., July 10, at the Cooperative Extension Office at 4955 Energy Way in Reno. This program offers current, research-based information useful to Nevada’s green-industry professionals.

“Biotic disorders are caused by living things, while abiotic disorders are caused by non-living things,” said Jenn Fisher, Cooperative Extension Commercial Horticulture Program coordinator. “Understanding the difference helps industry professionals know how to treat common landscape problems quickly and accurately.”

Leslie Lyles, with Stewardship Horticultural, will teach the class, providing examples of abiotic and biotic disorders and explaining how to easily diagnose the disorders on the job.

The workshop is free and offers one International Society of Arboriculture Certified Arborist Continuing Education Unit (CEU) and one Pesticide Applicator CEU. Register online at the class registration page.

For more information on “Abiotic & Biotic Disorders” and other upcoming classes, visit the series website, or contact Fisher at fisherj@unce.unr.edu or 775-336-0249. Persons in need of special accommodations or assistance should call at least three days prior to the class they intend to attend.

Classes offered for pickled and tomato products

Participants will learn how to preserve certain foods at upcoming Cooperative Extension workshops. Photo by Melody Hefner, Cooperative Extension.

Cooperative Extension offers food preservation workshops starting July 10

University of Nevada Cooperative Extension’s Food Preservation Program will be offering free workshops on pickled products July 10 and on tomato-based products July 11.

“In addition to learning the preservation process, attendees will learn about water bath canning, equipment and elevation adjustments,” said Elizabeth Mapula, University of Nevada Cooperative Extension Food Preservation Program officer.

Workshops are free to attend; however, pre-registration is required, as space is limited. Workshops will be held at the Cooperative Extension office at 8050 Paradise Road, Suite 100, in Las Vegas.

The workshops will be held 5:30-8:30 p.m.:

For more information, contact Mapula at 702-257-5517 or mapulae@unce.edu. Persons in need of special accommodations or assistance should call at least three days prior to the scheduled event.

Regional 4-H youth camp accepting applications

Youth at the Nevada 4-H Summer Camp enjoy a sunset on the shores of Lake Tahoe. Photo by Robert Moore, University of Nevada, Reno.

Youth offered opportunity for hands-on STEAM learning

University of Nevada Cooperative Extension’s 4-H Youth Development Program in southern Nevada is accepting applications for the 2019 4-H Summer Camp to be held July 22-26 at South Lake Tahoe. Registrations must be submitted by July 15.

The 4-H Summer Camp provides an opportunity for 4-H youth ages 9-12 to participate in STEAM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts and Math) activities. Students will learn about nature, healthy lifestyles, robotics, GPS, rocketry, dramatic arts, leadership and creative arts, among other topics. Campers will also have time for outdoor activities, including kayaking, swimming, paddle boating and archery.

Youth must be 4-H members to register for camp. Membership is free, and interested youth may contact their local Cooperative Extension office to apply. The cost to attend the camp is $450 and covers bus transportation, lodging, meals, activities, a t-shirt and a group photo. Space is limited, and full payment is required to secure a spot.

4-H youth can register online at the registration page. For more information, contact Southern Nevada 4-H Program Manager Karen Best at 702-257-5538 or bestk@unce.unr.edu.

Classes offered for pickled and tomato products, pie fillings and jams

Participants will learn how to preserve certain foods at upcoming Cooperative Extension workshops. Photo by Melody Hefner, Cooperative Extension.

Cooperative Extension offers food preservation workshops starting June 18

University of Nevada Cooperative Extension’s Food Preservation Program will be offering four free workshops, one each on freezer jams, tomato-based products, pickled products and pie fillings, June 18-21 for anyone who wants to learn the basics.

“In addition to learning the preservation process, attendees will learn about water bath canning, equipment and elevation adjustments,” said Elizabeth Mapula, University of Nevada Cooperative Extension Food Preservation Program officer.

Workshops are free to attend; however, pre-registration is required, as space is limited. Workshops will be held at the Cooperative Extension office at 8050 Paradise Road, Suite 100, in Las Vegas.

The workshops will be held 5:30-8:30 p.m.:

For more information, contact Mapula at 702-257-5517 or mapulae@unce.edu. Persons in need of special accommodations or assistance should call at least three days prior to the scheduled event.

Free green industry class to discuss using native plants in the landscape

Native plants, such as Stanleya pinnata, are climate-adapted and often require less water to grow. Photo by Jenn Fisher, Cooperative Extension.

Cooperative Extension series teaches sustainable horticulture to local professionals

As part of the Green Industry Continuing Education Series, University of Nevada Cooperative Extension presents “Incorporating Native Plants Into the Landscape,” noon-1 p.m., June 11, at the Cooperative Extension Office at 4955 Energy Way in Reno. This program offers current, research-based information useful to Nevada’s green-industry professionals.

“Native plants are readily available at local nurseries,” said Jenn Fisher, Cooperative Extension Commercial Horticulture Program coordinator. “But, you have to know what you are looking for because they are often not labeled as native.”

The class, taught by Cooperative Extension’s Northern Nevada Horticulture Specialist Heidi Kratsch, will identify native plants and where to find them. Kratsch will also discuss how to incorporate native plants into existing and new landscapes. Register online at the workshop’s registration page.

For more information on “Incorporating Native Plants Into the Landscape” and other upcoming classes, visit the series website, or contact Fisher at fisherj@unce.unr.edu or 775-336-0249. Persons in need of special accommodations or assistance should call at least three days prior to the class they intend to attend.

Homeowners invited to Nevada Fire Board public meeting and Q&A

Cooperative Extension’s Living With Fire and the Nevada Fire Board of Directors invite homeowners to ask questions about wildfire safety at the Nevada Fire Board Meeting May 17. Photo by Cooperative Extension.

Cooperative Extension and board members available to answer questions about wildfire safety

University of Nevada Cooperative Extension’s Living With Fire Program and the Nevada Fire Board of Directors invite homeowners to attend the Nevada Fire Board Meeting and Public Q&A session May 17. Participants will have the opportunity to ask questions about wildfires, wildfire safety and how to be prepared if a wildfire occurs in their communities.

“This meeting gives homeowners the unique opportunity to watch a Nevada Fire Board meeting and to ask questions of representatives from various firefighting agencies,” said Jamie Roice-Gomes, manager of Cooperative Extension’s Living With Fire Program.

The event, part of Nevada Wildfire Awareness Month, is free and will take place 11 a.m.-3 p.m., at Greater Nevada Field, 250 Evans Ave. in Reno. Lunch will be provided. Register by May 12 online. For more information about the event or Living With Fire, visit the Living With Fire website, or contact Roice-Gomes at roicej@unce.unr.edu or 775-336-0261.

Nevada Wildfire Awareness Month is a collaborative effort of local, state and federal firefighting agencies; University of Nevada Cooperative Extension; and many others. This year’s theme is “Wildfires Happen. Is Your Community Prepared?”

Cooperative Extension’s Living With Fire Program, which began in 1997, teaches homeowners how to live more safely with the wildfire threat. The program has received numerous national awards, and been credited with spurring actions that have saved many homes.

Wildfires and Rodeos part of Reno Aces Country Festival game

The Living With Fire Program’s Ember House activity is one of several wildfire awareness activities available at the Country Festival: Reno Aces vs. Tacoma Rainiers game May 18. Photo by Ashley Andrews, Cooperative Extension.

Cooperative Extension and KBUL Radio sponsor Reno Aces vs. Tacoma Rainiers

University of Nevada Cooperative Extension’s Living With Fire Program, in partnership with KBUL Radio, Reno Rodeo and Night in the Country, presents Country Festival: Reno Aces vs. Tacoma Rainiers on May 18 as part of both Nevada Wildfire Awareness Month and the Reno Rodeo 100th Anniversary Celebration.

“This event gives us a chance to celebrate our western home while learning ways to reduce the impact of wildfire,” said Jamie Roice-Gomes, manager of Cooperative Extension’s Living With Fire Program. “With wildfires forecasted to burn more frequently and more intensely in the future, it’s important to be proactive and take steps to prepare our communities to face the threat.”

The game takes place at 6:35 p.m. at Greater Nevada Field, 250 Evans Ave. in Reno. Attendees will have the chance to explore wildland brush trucks on the plaza, play the Ember House youth bean-bag-toss activity, answer wildfire trivia and watch Smokey Bear throw the ceremonial first pitch.

For more information about the event, visit the event website. For more information about Living With Fire, visit the Living With Fire website, or contact Jamie Roice-Gomes at roicej@unce.unr.edu or 775-336-0261.

Nevada Wildfire Awareness Month is a collaborative effort of local, state and federal firefighting agencies; University of Nevada Cooperative Extension; and many others. This year’s theme is “Wildfires Happen. Is Your Community Prepared?”

Cooperative Extension’s Living With Fire Program, which began in 1997, teaches homeowners how to live more safely with the wildfire threat. The program has received numerous national awards and been credited with spurring actions that have saved many homes.

Volunteers needed for replanting University vineyard

The University’s Desert Farming Initiative is hosting a Vineyard Planting Day on May 11 to continue over 20 years of wine grape research. Photo by Grant Cramer, Nevada Agricultural Experiment Station.

Desert Farming Initiative seeks help planting wine grapes in demonstration vineyard

The University of Nevada, Reno, Desert Farming Initiative is looking for community members to help replant a vineyard in an effort to expand upon over 20 years of wine grape research done by the Nevada Agricultural Experiment Station. Participants will receive hands-on experience learning the first steps in developing a vineyard, as well as learn more about some of the Initiative’s current projects.

“There is a lot of interest in growing wine grapes in northern Nevada,” said Desert Farming Initiative Program Manager Charles Schembre. “A handful of small-scale commercial growers want to expand their businesses and want the University’s help with research.”

The Vineyard Planting Day is 9 a.m.-1 p.m., May 11, at the Experiment Station’s Valley Road Field Lab, 920 Valley Road in Reno. Snacks and water will be provided, but volunteers should bring water bottles and garden gloves. The vineyard, funded by the Nevada Department of Agriculture, Specialty Crop Block Grant, will include cabernet franc and merlot wine grapes, which create a Bordeaux-style wine when blended. The grapes were chosen based on research already performed by the Experiment Station and research done in other high-altitude locations, such as in Argentina.

The Desert Farming Initiative is a collaboration of the University’s College of Agriculture, Biotechnology & Natural Resources, including the Nevada Agricultural Experiment Station and Cooperative Extension. For more information on the Initiative or the Vineyard Planting Day, contact Schembre at cschembre@cabnr.unr.edu or 775-682-9783, or visit the event website.

Youth prepare for 80th annual Nevada Junior Livestock Show

Youth show off a champion lamb at last year’s Nevada Junior Livestock Show. Photo by Anne Bothwell.

Statewide youth event showcases youth and the animals they raised

The Nevada Junior Livestock Show, in partnership with University of Nevada Cooperative Extension’s Nevada 4-H Youth Development Program, FFA and Grange Youth, present the 80th annual Nevada Junior Livestock Show, May 8-12. Youth ages 9-19 throughout the state and parts of California will be judged on their showmanship and knowledge of their chosen animals at the Reno-Sparks Livestock Events Center, located at 1350 N. Wells Ave. in Reno.

“This event is a great place for the public to come interact with youth in agriculture and learn where food comes from and about the people who raise it.” said Nevada Junior Livestock President Matt McKinney. “In addition, for many youth, this is the end of their projects. Everything they’ve been doing for the past several months culminates in this show.”

The youth have spent months raising, grooming and training their market animals. In the process, they learned animal husbandry and became familiar with livestock industry practices. They also learned additional skills, such as record keeping, finances, budgeting and managing time working with their animals. Many participants also competed at county and regional shows to earn the right to participate.

Participants will present what they’ve learned in showmanship competitions for steers, dairy cattle, sheep, swine, dairy goats, market goats, rabbits and turkeys, May 8-11, with a livestock auction at 4:30 p.m., May 11, and the awards ceremony at 9 a.m., May 12.

For 80 years, the Nevada Junior Livestock Show has provided an opportunity for 4-H, FFA, Grange Youth and independent youth members to exhibit their livestock projects before the public, promoting and providing the incentive for achieving excellence in livestock production, skills and practices. The program has also encouraged sportsmanship, leadership, citizenship and responsibility in the youth participants. For more information, visit the Department of Agriculture’s website.

Locally grown berry plants for sale by Master Gardeners

Plant Diagnostician Wendy Hanson Mazet (left) and Master Gardener Coordinator Leilani Konyshev prepare red raspberry plants for the online Master Gardener Berry Plant Sale. Photo by Tiffany Kozsan, Cooperative Extension.

Cooperative Extension sale includes strawberry, red raspberry, black raspberry and blackberry varieties

University of Nevada Cooperative Extension’s Master Gardeners are selling berry plants that were started in the Nevada Agricultural Experiment Station’s greenhouses. At least 1,500 plants will be available, including three strawberry varieties, two red raspberry varieties, two blackberry varieties and one black raspberry variety.

“Black raspberries in particular are good plants,” said Cooperative Extension Plant Diagnostician Wendy Hanson Mazet. “It’s worth it to deal with a few thorns to have something that grows well, is low maintenance and has high antioxidant levels.”

Black raspberries, red raspberries and blackberries are $10 each, with some smaller pots being sold as three plants for $25. Strawberries are $5 for a pot with two plants. The sale is online only, ending at 9 a.m., Friday, May 3. Plants can be ordered online at the sale’s website. Plants will be available for pickup 9 a.m.-noon, Saturday, May 4 at the Cooperative Extension office at 4955 Energy Way in Reno.

The Master Gardeners will use the proceeds to update equipment used to identify insects and plant problems, as well as equipment for community outreach. Extension’s Master Gardener Program trains volunteers interested in horticulture to provide research-based horticulture information and assistance. Master Gardeners must complete 50-80 hours of coursework and hands-on training, and then volunteer at least 50 hours to become certified Master Gardener volunteers.

For more information about Master Gardeners, the sale or for general horticultural inquiries, contact Master Gardeners at 775-336-0265 or mastergardeners@unce.unr.edu, or visit www.unce.unr.edu.

Free Spanish and English landscape class discusses pruning techniques

Cooperative Extension offers “Pruning Techniques” May 1 as part of a series of free landscaping trainings in Spanish and English. Photo by Trenton Mazet.

Classes to teach landscaping skills and solutions to common landscape problems

University of Nevada Cooperative Extension is offering free landscaping trainings taught in both Spanish and English. The workshops are designed to enhance employability skills and increase job retention. The last class in this series will be 5:30-8:30 p.m., May 1, at the Cooperative Extension office at 4955 Energy Way in Reno.

The topic for the class is pruning techniques, and the class will also focus on improving English skills, meeting job expectations, paying attention to details, and practicing personal safety and worker protection. The class is open to both public and private employers, and to the general public, with funding provided by the U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service and the department’s National Institute of Food and Agriculture. Participants will receive a certificate.

“These classes are designed to teach both new and experienced workers,” said Cooperative Extension Urban Integrated Pesticide Safety Program Assistant Melody Hefner. “Both English and Spanish speakers are welcome.”

Those interested in attending can register online at the workshop’s registration page, or by calling 775-787-2000 (Spanish) or 775-336-0247 (English). Persons in need of special accommodations or assistance should call at least three days prior to the training.

Youth prepare for Washoe County 4-H Livestock Show

Washoe County 4-H member Shelby Evans shows her prize-winning sheep at the 2018 Washoe County 4-H Livestock Show. Photo by Sam Mitchell, Cooperative Extension.

Annual Cooperative Extension event showcases youth and the animals they raised

School-age youth will be showing their project animals at the Reno-Sparks Livestock Events Center during University of Nevada Cooperative Extension’s Washoe County 4-H Livestock Show, 9 a.m.-3 p.m., May 5. This annual family-friendly event gives 4-H youth the chance to show the livestock animals they have been raising, win ribbons and get valuable advice from livestock professionals. The Reno-Sparks Livestock Events Center is located at 1350 N. Wells Ave. in Reno.

“This event provides a chance for the public to see first-hand how animals are raised to market,” said Washoe County 4-H Youth Development Program Manager Sarah Chvilicek. “It also helps the kids fine-tune their decision-making, leadership and public-speaking skills. In addition, the preparation for the event improves the students’ knowledge and understanding of animal production, stewardship, quality assurance, food safety and prevention of disease progression and transfer.”

Participating youth have spent months raising, grooming and training their market animals. In the process, they learned animal husbandry and became familiar with livestock industry practices. To show the results of what they learned, they will be competing in categories for steers, sheep, swine, dairy goats and market goats. The event will also feature showmanship presentations and 4-H displays. The blue and red ribbon winning students in each category will move on to the Nevada Junior Livestock Show, May 8-12, in Reno, where they will compete against other youth, including other 4-H members, members of FFA and members of Grange Youth.

Nevada 4 H Youth Development is a program of University of Nevada Cooperative Extension. All 4-H programs engage youth in experiential, or “hands-on,” learning; teach citizenship, leadership and life skills, and are fueled by university-backed curriculum. Participants also receive guidance from adult mentors and are encouraged to take on proactive leadership roles. The 4-H Program is offered across the country through in-school and after-school programs, school and community clubs, and 4-H camps.

CAHNRS Faculty Feature: Hanu Pappu

Washington State University Extension News - Thu, 07/27/2017 - 11:44am
Hanu Pappu

We asked several CAHNRS Ambassadors, excellent students who love WSU and their college, to name their favorite or most influential professors. And now we’re featuring those nominated educators in this weekly series, which runs through the summer.

Today we’re showcasing Hanu Pappu, President Samuel Smith Distinguished Professor in the Department of Plant Pathology. Here are his answers to a few questions:

Where are you from?

Southern state of Andhra Pradesh, India

Where did you go to school?

I earned a B.S. from the Agricultural College in Bapatla, India, an M.S. from the Indian Agricultural Research Institute in New Delhi, India, and a Ph.D. from the University of Alberta in Edmonton, Canada.

How did you become interested in your field?

Diseases pose a serious threat to our food security and managing them continues to be a challenge as pathogens that cause diseases continue to evolve.

Why did you want to become a professor?

I realized that I enjoy sharing with others what I know and being a professor gave me a chance to help students develop critical thinking skills. 

What is your favorite thing about working with college students?

Answering their questions, which gives me some clues about their thinking process and their interests.

What advice would you pass along to students?

Never stop learning. Never stop being curious. Approach issues with an open mind. Try to make a positive difference. Never stop asking why and how.